Anyone worried about the survival of the micro-industry that is known as Street-style Photography, don’t be. The menswear shows this January were heaving with camera-toting hopefuls, who swarmed across the pavements to capture the best of the editors’ outfits, inadvertently lending truth to a rather worn-out style cliche that a good look can stop traffic. (As it turns out, even a bad look can stop traffic, just as long as there are 30 people flinging themselves into the middle of a road trying to photograph it.)

All this is business as usual now – street style is as much part of the fashion show experience these days as entitled people complaining about inconsequential things – but there was an air of novelty at the AW16 shows in that many of the street-style photographers seemed to have espoused a sartorial aesthetic that we at Snap rather liked. Shades of grey, navy and black presumably intended to blend into the background, actually seemed refined and rather cool against the general backdrop of jazzy prints and statement outerwear. So we photographed the photographers. How postmodern.

Snap the Look

 

Presumably, in the Stone Age, if you wanted someone to come to your next event, you’d just grab them by the hair and drag them there. A little later on, we suppose, it became customary to write the details on a piece of card and slot it through someone’s letterbox. But now it’s 2016, and look how far we’ve come. This objet d’art, comprising a small, antique-looking box filled with a glittery snake envelope, tiger sticker, pink tissue paper and a series of glass slides, was hardly the kind of thing you felt like handing over to a doorperson. It was more like an heirloom that you instantly formed an intention to keep for years and years, and perhaps pass on to your children and grandchildren, who are guaranteed, like you, to have no idea what it’s all about, but nonetheless marvel at its beauty. The above example belongs to Snap Fashion, and we had to prise it from his hands with quite some force in order to photograph it.

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